Listen to the Dawn Chorus

Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust recommends starting the day with nature's symphony at least once this spring

One of the highlights of spring is the dawn chorus. Although travel is restricted due to coronavirus we don’t have to miss out. Whilst the roads are quiet, this is a great time to listen to bird song wherever you live.

Some special species like bitterns and nightingales are virtually restricted to nature reserves; that's one of the reasons the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust protects these special places. But the dawn chorus can be heard almost anywhere – including from your garden!

Typically it's the male birds singing. They are staking claim to territories and demonstrating their prowess to females. Early in the morning, it's too dark to search for food and sound travels further in the still air. If you're a bird, it's the ideal time to show off.

the dawn chorus can be heard almost anywhere – including from your garden

Typically it's the male birds singing. They are staking claim to territories and demonstrating their prowess to females. Early in the morning, it's too dark to search for food and sound travels further in the still air. If you're a bird, it's the ideal time to show off.

If you can bear to set your alarm for 5am, that's when the chorus is at its loudest but birds do continue to sing through the morning so don't worry if you're a bit later to rise. The easiest way to listen is to simply open your window and take it all in. The other option is to take a short walk to somewhere where there are trees and shrubs. These could be street trees or your local park.

Even in the most urban areas, you can listen for the melodic songs of robins and blackbirds, chattering house sparrow, trills of goldfinches and cooing pigeons.

 

The "Tell us your Tune" guide to bird song

Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust is asking people to "tell us their tune"; what phrase do you use to remember birds by their song?

  • Great tit sings "teacher-teacher"
  • Chaffinch sings "ping-ping"
  • Wren sounds shrill with a trill and ear-piercingly loud
  • Yellowhammer sings "little-bit-of-bread-and-no-cheese"
  • Blackcap sounds like the Laurel and Hardy theme tune
  • Linnet flight call sounds like the communicators being opened in the original Star Trek
  • Cetti's warbler sings "Who!? Me!? I'm a cetti's warbler, I am, I am!"
  • Wood pigeon coos "Be careful Betty"