Far Ings

Far Ings

Emily Cunningham

No dogs
Wheelchair access
Visitor Centre
Toilets available

Far Ings National Nature Reserve

Far Ings is situated on the south bank of the Humber Estuary, a major east-west flyway for migrating birds. The sight and sound of a skein of geese flying over is spectacular.

The pits and reedbeds at Far Ings and along the Humber bank are a legacy of the tile and cement industry which flourished between 1850 and 1959. Thanks to pioneering management by the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, the reserve is now rich in wildlife and one of the UK strongholds for bittern.

What’s on

Visitor information

Peter Cairns/2020VISION

Know before you go

Facilities

  • Visitor Centre
  • Shop
  • Picnic area
  • Toilets
  • Disabled toilet
  • Baby changing facilities

Dogs

Dogs are not permitted on this reserve.

Access

Many paths are suitable for wheelchairs (except for closed gates when sheep are present). There is disabled access to two bird hides. Contact the Trust for further information.

Opening times

Reserve open at all times.
Visitor Centre open weekends and bank holidays 10am - 4pm, and Wednesdays, Thursday and Fridays 1pm - 4pm. Please note the Visitor Centre will be closed over Christmas from Saturday 22 December until Monday 31 December, reopening in the new year on Tuesday 1 January 2019.

Visitor Centre

Visitor Centre open weekends and bank holidays 10am - 4pm, and Wednesdays, Thursday and Fridays 1pm - 4pm.

Binoculars are provided, as well as interpretive and interactive displays giving you an insight into the history of Far Ings.

The centre is fully accessible on both floors, with toilet facilities and refreshments available to purchase.

The Visitor Centre is also the base for the educational services run at Far Ings providing a range of formal and informal educational activities for all ages and abilities. Take a look below for more information.

Please note the Visitor Centre will be closed over Christmas from Saturday 22 December until Monday 31 December, reopening in the new year on Tuesday 1 January 2019.

Group visits

Any organised groups wishing to visit a reserve must fill in a Group Visit Form at least one month in advance of their visit. You can find the form on our group visit page.

Alternatively if you are looking to bring a school group, visit our Education Centre page for information.

Car park

Free parking is available at the public car park at Chowder Ness, the Visitor Centre car park and the Ness End car park.

Bike racks are also available in the Visitor Centre car park and Ness End car park. Cycling is not permitting within the reserve.

Location and contact details

Far Ings National Nature Reserve
Far Ings Road
Barton-upon-Humber
North Lincolnshire
DN18 5RG

Please note, this postcode is for the nearest registered address as we are unable to get postcodes for nature reserves.

OS Map Reference: TA 011 229

Reserve enquiries:
01652 634507
farings@lincstrust.co.uk

Education enquiries:
01652 637055
faringseducation@lincstrust.co.uk  

Visitor Centre enquiries:
01652 637055
faringscentre@lincstrust.co.uk

Educational services

 

The Visitor Centre is the base for the Education Service at Far Ings. Room hire is available for private events, and we have a comprehensive range of formal and informal activities for all ages and abilities. 

Whether it's a school visit to learn about surveying techniques, family pond-dipping, or a guided walk for your group or club, we have something to suit your needs.

Find out more

Paul Harris/2020VISION

Habitats and species

Far Ings nature reserve is a diverse landscape made up of reedbeds, meadow and scrub, and both freshwater and saltwater environments. This varied habitat is rich in microscopic life and invertebrates, which in turn support fish such as perch and roach which provide a food source to a huge variety of birds including heron and kingfisher

Management work undertaken has improved the reedbed habitat and created more open feeding areas with the aim of attracting bitterns back as a nesting species. After an absence of 21 years, bitterns began breeding again in 2000. It is possible to hear them ‘booming’ in the spring from around March. A good location to try is the double decker hide at Ness End Farm, bitterns are seen from here on a regular but infrequent basis – they are very shy birds and good at hiding.

Walks and trails

There are three circular walks through the reserve, all of which are clearly waymarked. These are Chowder Ness Round (allow two hours), Blow Wells and Target Lake Loop (allow one hour), and Reedbed Path (allow half an hour).

The Viking Way walking route also crosses through Far Ings along the Humber Bank, and there are waymarked public footpaths around the reserve where you are permitted to take your dog.

Also available is the South Humber Heritage Trail. This walk is split in two sections and can be walked in either direction between Burton-upon-Stather and Winteringham and between Barton-upon-Humber and South Ferriby. There are five villages along the trail which have their own information leaflet, all of which can be downloaded below.

Wild Weekends

 

There's plenty to do around Far Ings, whether you want to stay around Barton-upon-Humber for walks with coastal views, or cross the Humber Bridge into Hull and enjoy the arts and heritage scene.

Why not turn your visit wild, and make a weekend of it!

Go WILD

Alexander Mustard

Keep in touch

Take a look at the Far Ings social media pages for the latest news, or search for an upcoming event.