Gibraltar Point

Gibraltar Point

Matthew Roberts

Dogs permitted Sept - March
Accessible routes
Visitor Centre & cafe
Toilets available

Gibraltar Point National Nature Reserve

Gibraltar Point is a dynamic stretch of unspoilt coastline running southwards from the edge of Skegness to the mouth of the Wash.

Known for its impressive views and sheer scale and diversity of wildlife, Gibraltar Point is worth visiting in different seasons to fully appreciate its landscape.

What’s on

Visitor information

Matthew Roberts

Know before you go

Facilities

  • Visitor Centre
  • Cafe
  • Shop
  • Toilets
  • Disabled toilet
  • Baby changing facilities

Dogs

Dogs must be kept on a short lead at all times, including on the beach and foreshore between September and March.
No dogs permitted on the beach or foreshore between 1 April to 1 September.
Please note there are grazing livestock present. 

Access

Most paths around the reserve are accessible for wheelchairs, pushchairs and mobility scooters. Download the Countryside for All map under 'Walks and trails' below for details on path surfaces, gradients and facilities.

Opening times

Reserve open at all times. Please note, the car park is closed at dusk.
Visitor Centre open summer (April - October) 10am - 4pm, and winter (November - March) 11am - 3pm, weekends until 4pm.

Please note these times are variable - the visitor centre and cafe may close early during bad weather.

Visitor Centre

Visitor Centre open summer (April - October) 10am - 4pm, and winter (November - March) 11am - 3pm, weekends until 4pm

The cafe offers a wide range of exciting and delicious dishes. Keep an eye out on our events page for seasonal events and afternoon teas.

Both cafe and visitor centre are fully accessible for wheelchairs.

The shop stocks a range of wildlife themed homewares and gifts, as well as Opticron binoculars who have produced a range of five Wildlife Trust binoculars, helping to enhance your enjoyment of wildlife.

Group visits

Any organised groups wishing to visit the reserve must fill in a Group Visit Form well in advance (at least 2 months) of their visit. Bookings are restricted to one group per day so that we can manage the reserve and it's facilities, including toilets and car parking, appropriately to make your visit more enjoyable.

To submit a request for a Group Visit Form or for more information, please email gibnnr@lincstrust.co.uk or call 01754 898079.

Alternatively if you are looking to bring a school group, visit our Education Centre page for information.

Car park

There are two car parks at Gibraltar Point - Beach Car Park and the larger Visitor Centre Car Park. There is a charge of £1 for 2 hours or £3 for the day which covers both car parks.

A combined car parking season ticket for Gibraltar Point and Snipe Dales is available for £10 for 12 months. The season ticket is available at the Snipe Dales Office, Gibraltar Point Visitor Centre or by post from:

Banovallum House
Manor House Street
Horncastle
LN9 5HF

Please make cheques payable to "Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust". Mark your envelope CPST and enclose a stamped addressed envelope.

Location and contact details

Gibraltar Point National Nature Reserve
Gibraltar Road
Skegness
Lincolnshire
PE24 4SU

Please note, this postcode is for the nearest registered address as we are unable to get postcodes for nature reserves.

OS Map Reference: TF 556 581

Visitor Centre and cafe: 
01754 898057
gibvc@lincstrust.co.uk

Reserve and wildlife enquiries: 
01754 898057
gibnnr@lincstrust.co.uk

Education enquiries: 
01754 762763 
gibeducation@lincstrust.co.uk

Educational services

 

The education provision offered at Gibraltar Point takes place in a variety of different ecosystems around the nature reserve. From coastal activities along the sand dunes to freshwater sampling and woodland activities, we have something to suit your needs.

Find out more

Matthew Roberts

Habitats and species

Gibraltar Point impresses by its sheer scale and diversity of wildlife but to appreciate it fully you need to see it in different seasons.

In spring, the first of the migrants stop off to refuel or establish territories. In summer, little terns may be seen fishing in the shallows and skylarks are in full song above the purple haze of the saltmarshes. In autumn, huge whirling flocks of waders can be seen on the high tides. And in winter, brent geese, shorelark and snow bunting can be seen as well as flocks of redwing and fieldfare.

Bird Observatory

There are 19 official Bird Observatories throughout Britain, of which Gibraltar Point was one of the earliest starting up in 1949. These observatories allow long-term monitoring of bird populations and migration to be recorded from a defined area.

The work of the observatory is carried out voluntarily by local and visiting ornithologists. The observatory also fulfils a valuable training role in bird ringing, with residential training courses held almost every year.

Thanks to the work from these volunteers, we have been able to collect valuable information about the movements, condition and population of visiting birds, all essential for framing and implementing measures for conservation.

Bird Observatory blog

 

Written by the Bird Observatory Team, read the latest bird sightings and bird ringings, along with news of other wildlife spotted on the reserve.

Go to blog

Gary Mantle

Walks and trails

There a number of walkways, cycle tracks and fully accessible paths through Gibraltar Point. The Lincolnshire County Council Countryside for All leaflets detail path surfaces, gradients, cross-slopes as well as the location of seats, steps and gates.

Download the maps below to plan your next visit.

Wild Weekends

 

There's plenty to do around Gibraltar Point, whether it's long coastal walks and open scenery you're after, or a seaside getaway with the kids. 

Why not turn your visit wild, and make a weekend of it!

Go WILD!

Emma Bradshaw

Keep in touch

 

Follow the Gibraltar Point team on Facebook and Twitter for the latest news, search for an upcoming event, or take a look at the most recent sightings on the Bird Observatory blog.