Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust secures Heritage Lottery Fund support for Lincolnshire’s Wildflower Meadow Network

Tuesday 22nd April 2014

Red Hill nature reserve - Barrie WilkinsonRed Hill nature reserve - Barrie Wilkinson

Following the successful Life on the Verge project, Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust has received a grant of £76,300 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) for the new Lincolnshire’s Wildflower Meadows Network project.

The project will inspire local communities to create and restore wildflower meadows, developing a network of wildflower-rich meadows through Lincolnshire’s rolling hills in the south-west of the county, the Lincoln Edge and the Lincolnshire Wolds. 

Wildflower Meadow Project Officer, Mark Schofield, said “Wildflower meadows have been in decline for decades but through the Trust’s hugely successful Life on the Verge project we discovered that important, previously un-recorded, meadows are present in Lincolnshire. We wish to develop these into a network of meadows and flower-rich road verges by engaging local communities and private landowners to create and restore wildflower meadows.”

The Lincolnshire’s Wildflower Meadow Network project will inspire, involve and train volunteers in wildflower meadow creation and management by establishing demonstration sites, community projects, holding events and training days. Local wildflower seed and green hay will be collected from Trust nature reserves including our Coronation Meadow Red Hill for use on project sites. Guidance manuals on meadow creation and management will be developed for the Trust’s website.

Head of Conservation at the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, Caroline Steel, said “Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust has a good track record in terms of management, restoration and creation of wildlife-rich grassland. On our own land, we have successfully created new areas of wildflower meadow adjacent to existing nature reserves such as the Coronation Meadow at Red Hill. We are excited that through this new project we will be able to expand this work over the next three years; working with local communities and landowners to restore and create wildflower meadows.”
 

 

 

 

 

 

Tagged with: Living Landscapes, Species